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Test Your Stuff

Originally Published: March 6, 2014
Updated: September 2, 2016

Until recently we were able to test material for lead and other heavy metals using our handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) instrument. Lead Safe America Foundation is not currently accepting soil samples or personal items to test. We are currently restructuring, and as a result we are unable to process samples sent to us at this time. 

We do recommend some alternative options.

  • The University of Massachusetts Soil and Plant Nutrient Testing Lab has a quick turnaround and a very reasonable fee. Reach them at http://soiltest.umass.edu.
  • You can also contact your local health department to see if they have a connection to a professional in your community with an XRF to test personal items.
  • If you require immediate results, we recommend you hire a certified hazard assessor in your area, or send things in to an accredited lab.
  • CertifiedKit.com sells kits that allow you to collect samples and send them in for testing.  Results from CertifiedKit.com are then provided via email.

We are sorry for any inconvenience that this causes you, and we are considering options for future service in this area.

Thank you for understanding.

Richard Seymour
Interim Executive Director
Lead Safe America Foundation

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10 Responses to Test Your Stuff

  1. randall January 23, 2015 at 10:56 am #

    what resources are there for those of us in canada? we are using one-off lead testing kits (first alert) for the house. of course, they don’t test anything within ourselves.

    any suggestions for your northern neighbours [s.i.c] who are certainly affected by this as well?

    thanks, and keep it up!
    randall

    • Tamara January 24, 2015 at 12:45 am #

      I will post this out to some list-serves and see what kind of information I can find for you (in terms of local resources), Randall! Thank you for your support of our work.

  2. Rebecca February 4, 2015 at 9:03 am #

    Hi. I am hoping you have done testing on crockpots and other slow cookers. I found one site who tested with no lead other than that natural occurring amount in clay. I found another who said the amount was unsafe when tested. Any thoughts? I have contacted companies and they say they do not add lead to their inserts or glaze.

  3. sravanthi July 21, 2015 at 12:18 pm #

    Hi,
    Could we send some “indian spice” samples to get them tested? The whole family was found to have high levels of lead – we suspect turmeric powder bought in India, but it would be great if we could confirm our suspicion.

  4. sravanthi July 21, 2015 at 12:19 pm #

    Hi,
    Could we send some “indian spice” samples to get them tested?

  5. Marlana Milne May 27, 2016 at 6:57 am #

    Do you test backyard soil samples? If so,what is the best way to deliver soil to you? (packaging, quantity, etc). If not do you know who does this?

    Thank you.

  6. Trina P.de Leon June 14, 2016 at 5:18 am #

    I see a post for testing crockpots for lead but no brand mentioned. RIVAL is a popular brand of slow cookers made of ceramic that can chip off. I use this brand. Have you had lead tests for this brand?

  7. Tamara April 19, 2014 at 5:14 pm #

    Thank you, Karen!!!!

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